Gallery Links
Users Online
· Guests Online: 10

· Members Online: 0

· Total Members: 4,805
· Newest Member: CarolinaS
Forum Threads
Theme Switcher
Switch to:
Last Seen Users
· Liliane D< 5 mins
· MorganA< 5 mins
· eklans< 5 mins
· libor00:19:25
· Auratus01:10:53
· Jim Senn01:26:17
· Tony Irwin01:30:34
· JPecca01:37:05
· evdb01:37:42
· Zeegers02:21:55
Latest Photo Additions
View Thread
Diptera.info :: Miscellaneous :: General queries
Who is here? 1 guest(s)
 Print Thread
Fly bubble blowing
pierred
#41 Print Post
Posted on 27-06-2006 05:47
User Avatar

Member

Location: Paris (France)
Posts: 1376
Joined: 21.04.05

Yet another family.

This time, a Sepsid (Themira ?)
pierred attached the following image:


[72.76Kb]
Pierre Duhem
 
Nikita Vikhrev
#42 Print Post
Posted on 27-06-2006 08:05
User Avatar

Member

Location: Moscow, Russia
Posts: 9004
Joined: 24.05.05

I think it is Nemopoda nitidula.
Nikita
Nikita Vikhrev - Zool Museum of Moscow University
 
Paul Beuk
#43 Print Post
Posted on 27-06-2006 08:06
User Avatar

Super Administrator

Location: Netherlands
Posts: 19059
Joined: 11.05.04

The tip of the wing seems shaded so that is the logical conclusion.
Paul

- - - -

Paul Beuk on https://diptera.info
 
diptera.info
pierred
#44 Print Post
Posted on 27-06-2006 19:45
User Avatar

Member

Location: Paris (France)
Posts: 1376
Joined: 21.04.05

Thanks to both of you
Pierre Duhem
 
Nik Wiman
#45 Print Post
Posted on 28-06-2006 18:54
Member

Location: Pacific Northwest USA
Posts: 1
Joined: 12.06.06

Hi folks, first time poster. My .02 on fly bubbling. I tend to think it has a digestive function. The tachinids I'm rearing do it after imbibing on a nectar mixture I feed them, regrdless of temperature, sun position, or sex. Attached photo of Nemorilla pyste, a parasitoid of Choristoneura spp. taken today 6/28/06. Cheers, Nik
Nik Wiman attached the following image:


[25.36Kb]
 
Paul Beuk
#46 Print Post
Posted on 28-06-2006 19:13
User Avatar

Super Administrator

Location: Netherlands
Posts: 19059
Joined: 11.05.04

Hmm, just a little reminder: http://www.dipter...#post_2561.
Paul

- - - -

Paul Beuk on https://diptera.info
 
diptera.info
walwyn
#47 Print Post
Posted on 05-08-2006 20:46
Member

Location: Warwickshire, UK
Posts: 174
Joined: 16.06.06

Not just diptera I have a photo of Neuroptera engaged in the same activity.
 
http://professor-moriarty.com/info/section/entomol
walwyn
#48 Print Post
Posted on 05-08-2006 20:49
Member

Location: Warwickshire, UK
Posts: 174
Joined: 16.06.06

I have a photo of a lacewing engaged in the same activity.
walwyn attached the following image:


[133.32Kb]
 
http://professor-moriarty.com/info/section/entomol
brian reily
#49 Print Post
Posted on 22-08-2006 21:44
Member

Location:
Posts: 41
Joined: 08.08.06

many flies regurgitate in order to digest their food
confused... as usual
 
LordV
#50 Print Post
Posted on 24-08-2006 09:21
Member

Location:
Posts: 669
Joined: 06.09.05

brian reily wrote:
many flies regurgitate in order to digest their food


But how does this help them digest the food ?
Concentration of the food?
More/fresh enzymes from the salivary glands ?

Brian V.
 
Cole Gilbert
#51 Print Post
Posted on 27-08-2006 23:47
Member

Location:
Posts: 1
Joined: 27.08.06

I was just alerted to this list and this fly behavior. I agree with the suggestion that data be taken on the orientation of the fly and drop relative to the sun as the thermoregulatory idea may have some traction. I have never seen the behavior, but the photos are reminiscent of behavior of nectar sipping Hymenoptera that regurgitate a droplet of nectar thus exposing it to the air for evaporation of water and concentrating its contents.
 
pierred
#52 Print Post
Posted on 30-08-2006 20:35
User Avatar

Member

Location: Paris (France)
Posts: 1376
Joined: 21.04.05

Hello,

Just for the fun, an Hymenoptera bubbling !!
pierred attached the following image:


[46.68Kb]
Pierre Duhem
 
Don Martin
#53 Print Post
Posted on 19-09-2006 09:10
User Avatar

Member

Location: Oslo, Norway
Posts: 37
Joined: 19.09.06

Here is another one. A Mesembrina mystacea facing east in a cloudy but light afternoon Smile The temperature is about 13 C

www.linerle.com/insekter/_MG_6759.jpg

Don Martin
 
http://www.linerle.com/insekter/
Paul Beuk
#54 Print Post
Posted on 19-09-2006 09:44
User Avatar

Super Administrator

Location: Netherlands
Posts: 19059
Joined: 11.05.04

Nice pic! Grin
Paul

- - - -

Paul Beuk on https://diptera.info
 
diptera.info
Cor Zonneveld
#55 Print Post
Posted on 14-10-2006 10:48
User Avatar

Member

Location: Amstelveen, the Netherlands
Posts: 840
Joined: 14.10.06

LordV wrote:
New theory on this behaviour. Over the last few cold bright days (air temp around 3-6'C) Every time the sun has actually been bright, I've found all the Scatphaga on one bush in the bright sun were bubbleblowing (around 3-4 of them). I don't normally see bubble blowing at that high frequency. Wonder if it's a way of warming up faster by letting the drop warm up in the sun and then sucking it back in again. Another reason for wondering this is normally flies seem to to sunbathe with their back to the sun (ie head away from the sun), whilst when they are bubble blowing they always seem to be facing the sun or at least at right angles to it, so the bubble is getting full sun.
Brian V.


I wonder about the physics of the process. Flies are generally some rather dark colour, so they take up solar heat easily. The fluid drops are mostly translucent, so any light just passes through them and little heat will be absorbed.

I attach a photograph of a small Sepsidae with a bubble. It was fully clouded weather, and on top of this, the fly would have been in full shadow if there were any sunshine!

So to me physics and some observations are not consonant with the heating-up-your-food hypothesis.

I'm sorry I cannot come up with something more positive...
Cor Zonneveld attached the following image:


[139.83Kb]
Edited by Cor Zonneveld on 14-10-2006 11:09
Thanks for your attention
Cor Zonneveld
 
www.corzonneveld.nl
LordV
#56 Print Post
Posted on 14-10-2006 11:14
Member

Location:
Posts: 669
Joined: 06.09.05

Cor Zonneveld wrote:

I wonder about the physics of the process. Flies are generally some rather dark colour, so they take up solar heat easily. The fluid drops are mostly translucent, so any light just passes through them and little heat will be absorbed.

I attach a photograph of a small Sepsidae with a bubble. It was fully clouded weather, and on top of this, the fly would have been in full shadow if there were any sunshine!

So to me physics and some observations are not consonant with the heating-up-your-food hypothesis.

I'm sorry I cannot come up with something more positive...


Think you are probably correct ie heat transfer is not significant factor. I think it much more likely that it is purely a concentrating process by evaportion of perhaps a chance to remix the stomach contents with a new batch of salivary gland enzymes.
Brian V.
 
pierred
#57 Print Post
Posted on 14-10-2006 11:59
User Avatar

Member

Location: Paris (France)
Posts: 1376
Joined: 21.04.05

Hello,

Paul Beuk wrote:
Hmm, just a little reminder: http://www.dipter...#post_2561.


I think we should all look at what Paul said, quite at the beginning of this thread (which is really interesting as such, anyway, thanks for going on, folks). This is a matter of digestion. Flies (and probably other insects) absorb as much as they can at the spot, knowing that they will after have time to hunger or digest.

On the other hand, in Matile/Seguy's work, the tractus of diptera is described as comprising a "jabot" (in French, I understand it as a side chamber) where the fly can accumulate what it intakes, knowing it will have later on time to manage/transform it.
Pierre Duhem
 
pierred
#58 Print Post
Posted on 18-03-2007 06:58
User Avatar

Member

Location: Paris (France)
Posts: 1376
Joined: 21.04.05

Hello,

This time, another point of view on the bubble. One can see how the bubble is formed by the mouthparts.
pierred attached the following image:


[49.44Kb]
Pierre Duhem
 
saturdaze
#59 Print Post
Posted on 05-04-2007 20:22
User Avatar

Member

Location: California
Posts: 6
Joined: 05.04.07

I suspect that the regurgitation is simply a mechanism to concentrate the fluid food by evaporation. Because nutrients are dilute in many fluid foods, this behavior relieves the excretory system of some of its work. Honey Bees extend tongues and develop a film of nectar, and the fanning of wings in the hive increases evaporation due to increased heat and air circulation--result: honey.
 
Kahis
#60 Print Post
Posted on 05-04-2007 21:13
User Avatar

Member

Location: Helsinki, Finland
Posts: 1999
Joined: 02.09.04

saturdaze wrote:
I suspect that the regurgitation is simply a mechanism to concentrate the fluid food by evaporation. Because nutrients are dilute in many fluid foods, this behavior relieves the excretory system of some of its work. Honey Bees extend tongues and develop a film of nectar, and the fanning of wings in the hive increases evaporation due to increased heat and air circulation--result: honey.


The problem I have with this idea is that it makes little sense from a physicist point of view. A spherical droplet is the worst possible geometry for evaporation; it has the smaller surface area for the volume. A thin film is much better for this purpose. Absorbing water and allowing it to evaporate from the tracheal system would be probably much more efficient. For most insects retaining enough water is a problem, not having too much of it Smile
Kahis
 
www.iki.fi/kahanpaa
Jump to Forum:
Similar Threads
Thread Forum Replies Last Post
Bubble-blowing Muscidae? Diptera (adults) 5 17-11-2021 11:27
ID Muscidae or Anthomyiidae (bubble blowing)? Diptera (adults) 2 02-11-2021 19:07
Saltella nigripes blowing a bubble. Diptera (adults) 4 17-02-2021 17:57
Sepsidae with bubble. -> Sepsis cynipsea ? Diptera (adults) 7 21-10-2017 09:30
Musca Blowing bubble Diptera (adults) 3 16-02-2013 11:40
Date and time
04 December 2022 17:10
Login
Username

Password



Not a member yet?
Click here to register.

Forgotten your password?
Request a new one here.
Temporary email?
Due to fact this site has functionality making use of your email address, any registration using a temporary email address will be rejected.

Paul
Donate
Please, help to make
Diptera.info
possible and enable
further improvements!
Latest Articles
Syrph the Net
Those who want to have access to the Syrph the Net database need to sign the
License Agreement -
Click to Download


Public files of Syrph the Net can be downloaded HERE

Last updated: 25.08.2011
Shoutbox
You must login to post a message.

09.10.22 17:07
Yes, dipterologists from far abroad, please buy your copy at veldshop. Stamps will be expensive, but he, the book is unreasonably cheap Smile

07.10.22 11:55
Can any1 help out with a pdf copy of 1941 Hammer. Vidensk. Meddel. Dansk Naturhist. Foren. 105; thank you

05.10.22 19:59
Found! https://www.veldsh
op.nl

05.10.22 19:53
@zeegers, your book seems difficult to get from Spain, is there another way?

08.09.22 09:29
Ladies and gentlemen https://jeugdbonds
uitgeverij.nl/prod
uct/families-of-fl
ies-with-three-pul
villi/

26.08.22 15:06
Lis - This is vol.11 (eleven) and is 346 pages. Sorry, don't have a copy.

15.08.22 14:22
Hello, can any1 help out with a copy of Catalogue of Palaearctic Diptera II: Scathophagidae-Hyp
odennatidae? or at least how many pages it is? thx

19.06.22 07:42
I can not post an image - I do all right - dont know what to do! Gunther

24.05.22 11:28
Hi! would anyone be able to send on a scan of Delia sanctijacobi redescription from: GRIFFITHS, G.C.D. 1993. Anthomyiidae [part]. In: Flies of the Nearctic Region, 8(2), 10. Thank you!

18.05.22 16:26
Delay, alas, due to Covid related issues. But it will be published !!

Render time: 9.73 seconds | 172,412,117 unique visits