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Diptera.info :: Identification queries :: Diptera (eggs, larvae, pupae)
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Stratiomyidae or psychodidae larvae ?
Dauges
#1 Print Post
Posted on 02-02-2020 14:30
Member

Location: Dordogne FRANCE
Posts: 9
Joined: 29.05.19

Hello there,
I found these larvae in a log hole, in wet sawdust, not in water (Dordogne, South West of France)
Here are photos of them dried and dead (they didn't move!) 2 days later, and prepared ( Canada basalm).
I'm not a specialist but I think they are Chloromya (Stratiomiydae) or Psychoda (Psychodidae). 20 tergites.
Can I have more information, link or ID ?
Thanks for answers.
Dauges
Dauges attached the following image:


[110.59Kb]
 
Dauges
#2 Print Post
Posted on 02-02-2020 14:36
Member

Location: Dordogne FRANCE
Posts: 9
Joined: 29.05.19

Dauges wrote:
Hello there,
I found these larvae in a log hole, in wet sawdust, not in water (Dordogne, South West of France)
Here are photos of them dried and dead (they didn't move!) 2 days later, and prepared ( Canada basalm).
I'm not a specialist but I think they are Chloromya (Stratiomiydae) or Psychoda (Psychodidae). 20 tergites.
Can I have more information, link or ID ?
Thanks for answers.
Dauges

Dauges attached the following image:


[79.26Kb]
 
Dauges
#3 Print Post
Posted on 02-02-2020 14:37
Member

Location: Dordogne FRANCE
Posts: 9
Joined: 29.05.19

Dauges wrote:
Dauges wrote:
Hello there,
I found these larvae in a log hole, in wet sawdust, not in water (Dordogne, South West of France)
Here are photos of them dried and dead (they didn't move!) 2 days later, and prepared ( Canada basalm).
I'm not a specialist but I think they are Chloromya (Stratiomiydae) or Psychoda (Psychodidae). 20 tergites.
Can I have more information, link or ID ?
Thanks for answers.
Dauges

Dauges attached the following image:


[65.38Kb]
 
Dauges
#4 Print Post
Posted on 02-02-2020 14:38
Member

Location: Dordogne FRANCE
Posts: 9
Joined: 29.05.19

Dauges wrote:
Dauges wrote:
Dauges wrote:
Hello there,
I found these larvae in a log hole, in wet sawdust, not in water (Dordogne, South West of France)
Here are photos of them dried and dead (they didn't move!) 2 days later, and prepared ( Canada basalm).
I'm not a specialist but I think they are Chloromya (Stratiomiydae) or Psychoda (Psychodidae). 20 tergites.
Can I have more information, link or ID ?
Thanks for answers.
Dauges

Dauges attached the following image:


[86.14Kb]
 
Tony Irwin
#5 Print Post
Posted on 02-02-2020 17:21
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Location: Norwich, England
Posts: 6267
Joined: 19.11.04

I would say these are Psychodidae. Telmatoscopus is known to breed in tree rot-holes. There is a key to genera of larvae in Wagner. R. 1997 Psychodidae. in Nilsson, A.N. (Ed.) Aquatic insects of North Europe - a taxonomic handbook. Vol.2.
Tony
----------
Tony Irwin
 
Dauges
#6 Print Post
Posted on 02-02-2020 17:57
Member

Location: Dordogne FRANCE
Posts: 9
Joined: 29.05.19

Many thanks Tony.

Philippe alias "Dauges"
 
atylotus
#7 Print Post
Posted on 03-02-2020 14:14
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Location: Amsterdam, NL
Posts: 978
Joined: 29.05.09

In my opinion the only described species with these characteristics (20 tergal plates and robust quadrangular head) is Copropsychoda brevicornis. In most other species the tergal plates are restricted to the last 2-3 segments or they have 26-27 plates on the full body. The only other species with 20 plates is Psychoda minuta , but the siphon is much longer in that species (about 6 times longer than width in minuta and reduced in Copropsychoda). Both species are quit small (up to 3mm), I'm not sure if Copropsychoda do have some more species in France. According to Smith (1989) C. brevicornis is adapted to feeding on the surface of dung. I have no reference for this species from treeholes. The larva of P. minuta (=P.spreta) has been reared from cow dung and rotting grass cuttings.
Edited by atylotus on 03-02-2020 14:19
 
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Date and time
02 December 2020 22:16
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28.11.20 19:50
Never letting them to dry too quickly before Grin?

24.11.20 16:44
Anybody knows how to avoid compound eyes invaginating when drying and how to restore them?

13.10.20 16:16
You can edit your own thread - button "Edit" below.

12.10.20 12:24
Can I edit a thread subject?

28.09.20 06:58
Use “new thread” buttom right below

26.09.20 16:56
How do I post ? Smile

28.08.20 11:57
That woul be up to me, as an administrator. Smile

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I want to move a thread to the Syphridae subforum - how can I do this?

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08.08.20 13:31
ah ok ! I didn't knew oops !

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