Gallery Links
Users Online
· Guests Online: 13

· Members Online: 0

· Total Members: 4,725
· Newest Member: Calle Ljungberg
Forum Threads
Theme Switcher
Switch to:
Last Seen Users
· Renko< 5 mins
· timbuk< 5 mins
· Roger Thomason< 5 mins
· Nosferatumyia00:30:37
· runetk00:45:45
· Iain MacGowan00:48:05
· Justafly00:51:58
· daveb2101:00:49
· Tony Irwin01:26:29
· Xespok01:42:30
Latest Photo Additions
View Thread
Diptera.info :: General Diptera forums :: Overviews
Who is here? 1 guest(s)
 Print Thread
Thoracic Setae
Tony T
#1 Print Post
Posted on 26-09-2007 23:15
User Avatar

Member

Location: New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 657
Joined: 08.02.07

The number and position of the setae on the thorax of Calliphorids (at least in North America) are critical for the determination of species. I made this figure to help me identify local Calliphorids and thought that it may be useful to others.
The setae are named based on their position and location, anterior-to or posterior-to the transverse suture (4). The setae are similar (repeated) either side of the mid-line.
- 1 acrostichal setae; presutural (2 in this fly) and postsutural (3 in this fly)
- 2 dorsocentral setae; presutural (3 in this fly) and postsutural (3 in this fly)
- 3 intra-alar setae; presutural (1 in this fly just above transverse suture) and postsutural (2 in this fly)
- 4 transverse suture
- 5 scutellum

Less important for species identification are:
- 6 presutural seta
- 7 posthumeral setae
- 8 humeral lobe with humeral setae

Top fly is Lucilia silvarum
Bottom fly with a similar configuration Calliphora vomitoria
Tony T attached the following image:


[146.14Kb]
Edited by Tony T on 27-09-2007 13:56
 
Paul Beuk
#2 Print Post
Posted on 27-09-2007 08:02
User Avatar

Super Administrator

Location: Netherlands
Posts: 18837
Joined: 11.05.04

Nice pictures. I still need to add the terms with good illustrations to the Glossary, so if I can use these...

Just one question: Isn't the usual term 'presutural' rather than 'anterosutural'?
Paul

- - - -

Paul Beuk on https://diptera.info
 
diptera.info
crex
#3 Print Post
Posted on 27-09-2007 10:02
User Avatar

Member

Location: Sweden
Posts: 1996
Joined: 22.05.06

You should also mention the commonly used abbreviations for these terms.
 
conopid
#4 Print Post
Posted on 27-09-2007 11:54
User Avatar

Member

Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 1026
Joined: 02.07.04

Tony, Paul,
This is really, extremely useful. It's much, much better than the line drawings one usually has to try and interpret. Can I suggest, if Tony has time over the coming months/years that the site contains a section where the major families are featured in this way. It would be useful to also provide a glossary of setae terminology, so that workers using different terms can check and be clear about the bristles that they are interpreting.

A particlular request - any chance of some similarly annotated photos for Sarcophagidae and Lonchaeidae - dorsal and lateral ? (Pretty please). lonchaeidae are causing me particular problems at the moment. I can never convince myself that I am looking at the correct bristles in some instances and so I am probably making many elementary mistakes. Photos of the fantastic quality seen here would really help with this issue.Smile

If you can undertake any of this work Tony, the amateur dipterist community will forever be in your debt!
Edited by conopid on 27-09-2007 12:12
Nigel Jones, Shrewsbury, United Kingdom
 
jorgemotalmeida
#5 Print Post
Posted on 27-09-2007 13:11
User Avatar

Member

Location: Viseu - PORTUGAL
Posts: 9257
Joined: 05.06.06

I'm doing that right now... conopid. Wink
 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/superegnum
Tony T
#6 Print Post
Posted on 27-09-2007 14:02
User Avatar

Member

Location: New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 657
Joined: 08.02.07

Paul Beuk wrote:
Nice pictures. I still need to add the terms with good illustrations to the Glossary, so if I can use these...

Just one question: Isn't the usual term 'presutural' rather than 'anterosutural'?

Don't know where I got "ante..." from, changed to "pre". Use them anyway you wish.

This is all new to me, tabanids don't bother with setaeGrin
So, if someone tells me the abbreviations, I will add them.
Working on the other families, 1st need to get decent photos.
 
jorgemotalmeida
#7 Print Post
Posted on 27-09-2007 14:16
User Avatar

Member

Location: Viseu - PORTUGAL
Posts: 9257
Joined: 05.06.06

Abbreviations for the thorax and leg.

--- not sure specially for intra-alar and scutellum --- I will update this throughout the day.

THORAX

Warning: setae is the plural form, seta is the singular form.

Acrostichal(s) seta(e) = ac seta(e). Or Ac seta(e).
Dorsocentral(s) seta(e) = dc seta(e). Or Dc seta(e).
Intra-alar(s) seta(e) = ia seta(e) not intralar or Intra alar.
Postsutural dorsocentral(s) seta(e) = post sut dc seta(e)
Presutural dorsocentral(s) seta(e) = pre sut dc seta(e)
Scutellum = sctl
Scutum = sct
Transverse suture = ts (on scutum)



Observations:

Microtrichium (plural: MICROTRICHIA) = hair like elements (without alveolus) -- erroneously called HAIRS. The hairs are a feature strictly of mammals.
Macrotrichium (plural: MACROTRICHIA) = bristle or seta. (plural: BRISTLES or SETAE). It has always an alveolus. Very strong macrotrichia are spurs or spines. TAKE A LOOK at the second photo - Calliphora vomitoria (see above), it shows very clearly an alveolus in the base of the presutural dorsocentral seta/bristle at our right. It lost the bristle, indeed. See the photos of Mycetophilidae in gallery to find the spurs on tibia.

seta (plural: SETAE) = bristle (plural: BRISTLES)
small seta/bristle = setula (plural: SETULAE)



LEG

The leg is composed by COXA, TROCHANTER, FEMUR, TIBIA, TARSUS (plural: TARSI). This reflects the order of a leg since the thorax.

Femur 1 = f1 -- the anterior femur (the first one that appears after the head) / Femur 3 = f3 -- the posterior femur (the first one that appears before the genitalia).

Tibia 1 = t1 -- the same as femur.

Tarsus 1 = ta1 -- the first segment of the tarsomere after the tibia. There are 5 segments in tarsus (tarsomeres). The first is called metatarsus or basitarsus; the last one is distitarsus.
Tarsus have five segments, the so-called, tarsomeres (going outward from tibia to the extremity of the leg). The distitarsus has sclerite bearing 2 claws.
Edited by jorgemotalmeida on 28-09-2007 10:24
 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/superegnum
Tony T
#8 Print Post
Posted on 27-09-2007 16:49
User Avatar

Member

Location: New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 657
Joined: 08.02.07

The primary character that separates the Families: Tachinidae, Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae, and Rhinophoridae from similar-looking flies in the Families: Muscidae, Anthomyiidae, Scathophagidae; and many other families
is the presence of a row of setae at the posterior edge of the meron (m).
The meron is a sclerite on the pleuron of the mesothorax lying just above and posterior to the coxa of the middle leg, below the calypteres and below and anterior to the halter.
- h halter
- m meron

Top image is a Sarcophagid,
Bottom image is a Muscid (left), note the bare meron (m);
and, on the right, a close-up of the Sarcophagid. Note the obvious 4 long black setae on the posterior edge of the meron (m).
Tony T attached the following image:


[116.8Kb]
 
conopid
#9 Print Post
Posted on 27-09-2007 16:50
User Avatar

Member

Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 1026
Joined: 02.07.04

Smile Tony and Jorge - this is going to be an invaluable resource. Many thanks for your work.
Edited by conopid on 27-09-2007 16:51
Nigel Jones, Shrewsbury, United Kingdom
 
Tony T
#10 Print Post
Posted on 29-09-2007 19:03
User Avatar

Member

Location: New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 657
Joined: 08.02.07

conopid wrote:
A particlular request - any chance of some similarly annotated photos for Sarcophagidae...... ?.

Dorsal view of thorax of a Sarcophagid, 7 September 2007, NB, Canada. The setal pattern is much less clear than that of Calliphorids (see previous image in this thread)
1: dc s, dorso central seta; usually 3-4 presutural dc s (presut dc s), and 3-4 postsutural dc s (psut dc s). 4 presut dc s and 4 psut dc s in this fly
2: ial s, intra-alar seta; usually 1-2 presutural ial s (presut ial s), and 1-2 postsutural ial s (psut ial s). 2 presut ial s and 2 psut ial s in this fly
3: pprn s, postpronotal seta; usually 2-4 setae. 3 pprn s in this fly
4: spal s, supra-alar seta; usually 1-2 presutural apal s, and 3 postsutural spal s. 2 presut spal s and 3 psut spal s in this fly
5: npl s, notopleural seta; usually 4 in Sarcophaginae, just 2 in Miltogramminae. 4 npl s in this fly
6: pal s, post alar seta; 2 in Sarcophagidae; 2 pal s in this fly.
7: psut acr s; postsutural acrostichal seta; usually a prescutellar pair; as here (1 psut acr s each side of mid-line).
8: ds sctl s; discal scutellar seta; just 1 ds sctl s on each side of mid-line
9: l sctl s; lateral scutellar seta; usually 2 or 3. 2 l sctl s in this fly.

Note the absence of presutural acrostichal seta and the reduction in number of postsutural acrostichal setae.
Tony T attached the following image:


[186.11Kb]
 
Kahis
#11 Print Post
Posted on 29-09-2007 19:16
User Avatar

Member

Location: Helsinki, Finland
Posts: 1999
Joined: 02.09.04

Great job, guys & girls & others (just trying to cover all bases here Smile)

The color spots showing which seta is which is very incluttered - an almost perfect illustration for the purpose. It would be perfect of you would have the names directly in the legend on the right side. Having to look up the number adds an unnecessary step.

Alternative names for some setae: first postsutural supra-alar -> prealar seta (logical - as Tony's illustration shows, it is in front of the wing base. The strength (or absence) of this seta is frequently used as a key character in Muscidae.


Kahis
 
www.iki.fi/kahanpaa
Tony T
#12 Print Post
Posted on 29-09-2007 21:22
User Avatar

Member

Location: New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 657
Joined: 08.02.07

Kahis wrote:
It would be perfect of you would have the names directly in the legend on the right side. Having to look up the number adds an unnecessary step.

Are you familiar with the expression "there's method in my madness"?Pfft
Abbreviations or names on an image become a big problem if a name is incorrect; it cannot be easily changed. The legend on the right side is part of the image. It is easy to change the accompanying textGrin.
 
Tony T
#13 Print Post
Posted on 30-09-2007 15:52
User Avatar

Member

Location: New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 657
Joined: 08.02.07

Lateral view of Sarcophagid thorax; see above dorsal image for legend to colour coding.
Tony T attached the following image:


[109.01Kb]
 
conopid
#14 Print Post
Posted on 30-09-2007 23:03
User Avatar

Member

Location: United Kingdom
Posts: 1026
Joined: 02.07.04

Oh wonderful. Thank you Tony and all. I shall be tackling a few Sarcophagids tomorrow night, armed with this excellent work.GrinGrin
Nigel Jones, Shrewsbury, United Kingdom
 
Tony T
#15 Print Post
Posted on 04-10-2007 21:12
User Avatar

Member

Location: New Brunswick, Canada
Posts: 657
Joined: 08.02.07

7 September 2007, NB, Canada
Hopefully a reasonably typical species. So many setae and hairs that I could not interpret the lateral viewPfft; even this dorsal view was not easy to interpret; from what I read there are supposedly just 5 pprn s but this fly appears to have 6Sad
same fly as wing detail posted on 02-10-2007 03:07:-
HERE
Tony T attached the following image:


[168.5Kb]
 
Susan R Walter
#16 Print Post
Posted on 05-10-2007 13:52
User Avatar

Member

Location: Touraine du Sud, central France
Posts: 1772
Joined: 14.01.06

I go away for a few weeks and come back to all this splendid work - these pages are really going to take some hits Grin

Very well done to Tony T and Jorge for taking the time to do this for all of us.
Susan
 
http://loirenature.blogspot.com/
Jump to Forum:
Similar Threads
Thread Forum Replies Last Post
Phoridae with long abdominal setae, Megaselia rufipes Diptera (adults) 3 07-01-2021 20:42
Help to ID the "group of setae" below the Inner Vertical Seta General queries 6 06-02-2014 22:09
Setae abbreviation question General queries 2 15-05-2012 13:36
Setae on the inside of abdomen...? General queries 3 05-02-2010 16:52
A fly with golden setae Diptera (adults) 2 21-01-2007 22:37
Date and time
09 December 2021 12:35
Login
Username

Password



Not a member yet?
Click here to register.

Forgotten your password?
Request a new one here.
Temporary email?
Due to fact this site has functionality making use of your email address, any registration using a temporary email address will be rejected.

Paul
Donate
Please, help to make
Diptera.info
possible and enable
further improvements!
Latest Articles
Syrph the Net
Those who want to have access to the Syrph the Net database need to sign the
License Agreement -
Click to Download


Public files of Syrph the Net can be downloaded HERE

Last updated: 25.08.2011
Shoutbox
You must login to post a message.

23.09.21 15:29
All sorted.

16.09.21 22:24
Sorry put 5 new threads in Asilidae forum instead in Syrphidae forum, can pleas an admin move it to Syrph? THANKS, Norbert

09.09.21 07:48
https://www.jeugdb
ondsuitgeverij.nl/
product/de-vliegen
families-met-drie-
voetkussentjes/

09.09.21 07:47
wing ventation is totally different

03.09.21 12:51
Hi, what's the major difference between dolichopodidae and rhagionidae? Can someone help me? Thanks!

28.06.21 15:24
thx TO eklans

03.06.21 11:11
@Tony Irwin Thank you Tony! I've emailed you there Pfft

02.06.21 22:26
Rob - can you PM me with an e-mail address, and I'll send it over.

02.06.21 13:16
Hello chaps! Does anyone have a copy of: Revision of the willow catkin flies, genus Egle Robineau-Desvoidy (Diptera: Anthomyiidae), in Europe and neighbouring areas ?? I'd be ever so grateful! Rob

31.05.21 14:31
The part that got deleted is "longer, dark median stripe on thorax"

Render time: 12.3 seconds | 159,814,028 unique visits