Thread subject: Diptera.info :: Ulidiidae from Canary Islands => Physiphora smaragdina

Posted by Marion Friedrich on 12-12-2019 01:01
#1

Hello,
the only Ulidiidae species listed in "LISTA DE ESPECIES SILVESTRES DE CANARIAS Hongos, plantas y animales terrestres 2009" for Canary Islands is Physiphora alceae (Preyssler, 1791). The species should "have black legs except fore tarsus with basitarsomere creamy yellow in basal 3 / 4 , mid- and hind tarsi yellow; all setae black; fore femur postero-ventrally with 5–7 thickened, but rather short setae in apical half."
On a new and old pictures from Fuerteventura basitarsomere of fore tarsus seems to be black. Do these flies belong to another species?

Marion

Edited by Marion Friedrich on 15-12-2019 14:51

Posted by Marion Friedrich on 12-12-2019 01:05
#2

an old picture from 2010

Posted by John Carr on 12-12-2019 01:13
#3

There are other species of Physiphora with black fore tarsi. Kameneva and Korneyev revised the genus in 2016 but the paper is not open access.

Posted by Nikita Vikhrev on 12-12-2019 10:41
#4

I suppose it is Physiphora smaragdina: black tarsi + widespread in Africa + recorded for Spain mainland (see: https://diptera.info/forum/viewthread.php?forum_id=5&thread_id=48169&pid=209025 or https://diptera.info/forum/viewthread.php?forum_id=5&thread_id=43641&pid=191145
or https://diptera.info/forum/viewthread.php?forum_id=5&thread_id=50937)

Posted by Marion Friedrich on 12-12-2019 17:27
#5

Thank you very much John and Nikita.
Physiphora smaragdina matches much better.
I will move my Fuerteventura photos to this species. It looks like all specimens from Fuerteventura have foretarsi with all tarsomeres black.

Marion

Posted by Nikita Vikhrev on 13-12-2019 14:15
#6

I'd better get confirmation from Dr. Korneev to be sure in P. smaragdina

Posted by Nosferatumyia on 13-12-2019 17:39
#7

It is.
I'd say, the first record from the Canaries

Posted by Marion Friedrich on 13-12-2019 23:31
#8

Thank you both. :)
It is.
I'd say, the first record from the Canaries

First record for the Canaries sounds good. But I'm wondering, why nobody else should have found this not uncommon species. On Fuerteventura I met the first specimen in 2006.

Marion

Posted by Nosferatumyia on 14-12-2019 10:34
#9

The problem is there were no keys. Either it was overlooked -- or it is an invider.
BTW, we have recorded it in Europe (Granada) quite recently, and also due to "citizen scientists" photoactivity.

Posted by Marion Friedrich on 15-12-2019 14:54
#10

Thanks. I almost forgot to remove the cf.

Marion